Help for Ukrainian citizens in Slovenia

Slovenia and its citizens wish to warmly welcome Ukrainian citizens fleeing the war. We are ready to provide you with accommodation, food and anything else you may need.

Preparing for arrival

Documents

If possible, please bring valid travel documents with you when you leave for Slovenia. However, if you are unable to do so, or if you do not have any medical documents with you (e.g. vaccination certificates, Covid-19 tests), this will not prevent you from entering the country.

Transit through Slovenia

If Slovenia is not your final destination and you are just passing through, you can find a lot of useful information about your destination country on the UNHCR site. If you are travelling by car, you will not need to buy a highway pass; the government has waived that requirement for people travelling for humanitarian reasons.

If your car breaks down and you need need roadside assistance, the Automobile and Motorcycle Association of Slovenia (AMZS) will provide it to you free of charge. The number to call is +386 1 5305 353.

Accommodation

Do not worry if you do not have a place to stay. Inform the border authorities that you need help with accommodation. They will arrange for you to stay at one of the locations they have prepared for you.

Temporary protection and work

Update (15.3.2022) The government has introduced a scheme of temporary protection for displaced persons from Ukraine. It is very similar to asylum, is valid for one year, and grants similar rights to those granted with asylum, although it is easier to obtain.

Ukrainian citizens can also apply for asylum or a long-term visa for employment or work in Slovenia. However, this should only come in step two.

The government website with relevant information about your options is here:

The government has set up a call centre that works from 8.00 to 18.00 at +386 1478 7530.

Useful links and information

European commission FAQ for helping refugees

At the border

Slovenia's borders with Italy, Austria, and Hungary are open (Schengen) borders, which means that you might drive across them without even noticing (and if you are using public transport, the vehicle might not stop at the border).

Please note that the normal checks apply at the border with Croatia, which is a regular (non-Schengen) border.

With a biometric passport

You can enter Slovenia and stay for up to 90 days. This means that you are essentially a tourist. However, while you do not require a visa, you do not have the right to work, nor do you have automatic health insurance.

You can apply for temporary protection (or asylum) at the border, but you are not required to do so.

If you have a place to stay, we recommend that you do not apply at the border. Instead, apply for asylum near to where you are staying (more on this below).

Without a passport

You can enter Slovenia without travel documents by applying for asylum at the border.


Urgent medical assistance

If you or your family members need urgent medical assistance upon arrival in Slovenia, please inform the border officials on duty at the border, or call 112 (emergency medical assistance) or 113 (police).

Update 14.3.2022: If you are an cancer patient or are undergoing any type of cancer treatment, please contact [email protected] or call +386 1 231 21 01 (8:00 to 15:00 weekdays, available in Slovenian, Croatian and English). You will be given further instructions on how to continue your treatment.

Pets

Update 14.3.2022: Slovenia has temporarily relaxed the rules for bringing pets across the border, but you will need to complete this form and send it to [email protected]. After you arrive at your final address in Slovenia, inform the authorities at the same email address. Remember to keep your pet in isolation.

In Slovenia

Temporary protection/asylum

(Section updated on 15.3.2022)

"Temporary protection" or "asylum" status allows you to integrate fully into Slovenian society. Some of the benefits of both statuses include:

  • accommodation and meals in accommodation centres, or financial assistance for private housing
  • the right to work in Slovenia
  • access to basic healthcare
  • access to education
  • financial aid ("pocket money")

Temporary protection is more straightforward to obtain for residents of Ukraine. It is temporary (for one year) with some opportunity for extension. In order to reduce uncertainty, we strongly suggest you apply for temporary protection first.

While you wait for your application to be processed, you do not have the right to work. Your medical care will be provided by the asylum shelter or by special centres that provide free healthcare [1] [2]. After you are granted temporary protection (or asylum), you will have access to the regular Slovenian health system (more on this below).

Slovenia will ensure that your temporary protection (or asylum) process is conducted in a language you understand. If you speak English well, it might be preferable to use it during the proceedings. This is because there is likely to be a shortage of Ukrainian translators.

The government website with relevant information about your options is here:


If you do not have a place to stay in Slovenia:

You should apply for temporary protection immediately at the border; the government will then provide you with shelter in one of their facilities while your application is being processed. This will cover your basic housing needs and allow you to move freely within the country (with some restrictions).

General information on government-provided shelter is available here: Ukrainian | Slovenian.

If you have a place to stay in Slovenia:

  • If you can stay with friends or relatives, it might be logistically easier for you to apply for temporary protection close to where you are staying.
  • Even if you decide not to apply for temporary protection (or asylum), you MUST register your temporary stay at a local police station within 3 days of your arrival. If you are staying in a hotel or similar, the host will automatically do this for you.

Applying for temporary protection (or asylum)

  • You can apply for temporary protection at any border crossing.
  • If you do not apply for temporary protection at the border, you may go to any government office. However, since they will only take you to the local police station (which is where the application process takes place), you are better off going directly to the station yourself. Here is a list of all police stations in Slovenia. Alternatively, you can find the nearest police station on Google Maps by simply searching for “police station”.
  • If you have a place to stay in Slovenia (friends, relatives, etc.), you are allowed to stay there while your temporary protection application is being processed (and afterwards, of course). We strongly suggest that your host goes with you when you apply; this will help prove to the authorities that you have somewhere to stay.
  • If you do not have a place to stay, the government will provide you with accommodation.

Shortly after you have submitted a temporary protection application, you will receive a card proving that you have temporary protection status (it is like an ID card). You will also receive a unique personal identification number ("EMŠO"), which you will need for all your official business. The card also acts as your temporary residence and work permit.

The approval process will include a personal interview at a police station. The government is unable to give any guarantees as to how quickly your application will be processed. The best information we currently have about the length of the process for Ukrainian residents is a couple of days.

If you can do this ahead of time, fill out this temporary protection form. Otherwise you will get one at the police station.

Alternatively, the details of the asylum application process are set out in this government document. However, this applies only to asylum, as "temporary protection" is a fast-tracked version of this process.

Other types of residence/work permit

While it is possible to get other types of resident and work permit besides those granted under temporary protection (or asylum), the procedures are lengthy (up to 6 months for a European blue card, for example) and nearly impossible to manage without help. As things stand, we strongly recommend that you apply for temporary protection status.

If you want to find a private accommodation in Slovenia:

(UPDATE 24.3.2022) There are a couple of services that can match you with privately provided free accommodation. These two are both pan-European:

  • https://www.ukraineshelter.com/ This is a volunteer-run site. They will check your request, get in touch with you and try to find a good match.
  • https://www.ukrainetakeshelter.com/ This is a pure peer-to-peer site. There are no intermediaries checking accommodation providers, so be extra careful to check the host's credentials in advance.

While there are many more such sites available, their coverage of options in Slovenia is generally limited.

(UPDATE 31.3.2022) If you are looking to rent commercially, here is a helpful video about real estate websites (in Ukrainian), as well as a explanation of the Slovenian real estate market and its customs (in Ukrainian). You can also check this Facebook group, which contains a lot of rental property postings. The biggest Slovenian real estate site is nepremicnine.net.


Within the first week

Do not forget to either apply for temporary protection or register your temporary stay at a local police station within 3 days of your arrival.

Material help

(UPDATE 24.3.2022) If you need material help, such as food, clothing or sanitary material, you can turn to Slovene Philanthropy. They are available every working day from 10:00 to 18:00, either in person at their main office, by telephone at +386 1 430 12 88 or on WhatsApp at +386 41 654 726.

Applying for pocket money (if you live in an asylum centre)

If you live in an asylum centre, you are entitled to "pocket money". You can expect about €125 each month. The application procedure starts automatically as soon as you are placed at the centre.

Applying for financial aid (if you have private accommodation)

(UPDATE 11.4.2022)

If you have received temporary protection, live in private housing (i.e. not provided by the government), do not have any savings that you can access, there is no person in Slovenia who is required by law to support you (e.g. a spouse) and you have not applied for full asylum, you are entitled to financial aid. The official details are here. Clearer instructions are provided below.

You need to fill out this form (in the Latin alphabet). You should then submit it, either in person or via ordinary post to this address:

Urad Vlade Republike Slovenije za oskrbo in integracijo migrantov
Cesta v Gorice 15
1000 Ljubljana

Submitting the application via e-mail is not allowed.


You need to add the following attachments:

  • a copy of transactions on your bank account for the last month
  • a copy of transactions on the bank account, for the last month, of anyone who is by law required to support you (e.g. spouse)
  • a copy of your temporary protection card

If you are unable to obtain your bank statements, you will need to attach a signed statement to that effect. We recommend that you write "I am unable to access my bank account from Slovenia and do not have electronic banking." Do not forget to put the date, place and your signature on it.

What amounts can you expect?

  • about €420 per month for the first adult in the family or a child (under 18) without an accompanying family member
  • about €295 per month for every next adult in the family
  • about €125 per month for each child under 18 (if both parents are in Slovenia) or about €250 per month if only one parent is with them

Applying for financial aid to pay rent (if you have private accommodation)

(UPDATE 11.4.2022)

If you have received temporary protection, live in private housing (i.e. not provided by the government), do not have any savings that you can access, there is no person in Slovenia who is required by law to support you (e.g. a spouse) and you have not applied for full asylum, you are entitled to help with paying rent. The official details are here. Clearer instructions are provided below.

You need to fill out this form (in the Latin alphabet). You should then submit it, either in person or by email [email protected] or ordinary post to this address:

Urad Vlade Republike Slovenije za oskrbo in integracijo migrantov
Cesta v Gorice 15
1000 Ljubljana

Submitting the application via e-mail is not allowed.

We recommend that you go there in person or use regular post. Technically, they should accept the application by email as well, but there are some doubts as to whether this institution is up-to-speed with the latest digitalisation regulations. If you decide to try email, you will need to print the form and then take a photo (or scan) of the signed form.

You need to add the following attachments:

  • a copy of transactions on your bank account for the last 3 months
  • a copy of transactions on the bank account, for the last 3 months, of anyone who is by law required to support you (e.g. spouse)
  • a copy of your rental agreement
  • agreement that the financial aid will be paid directly to the landlord (already part of the form)
  • a copy of your temporary protection card

If you are unable to obtain your bank statements, you will need to attach a signed statement to that effect. We recommend that you write "I am unable to access my bank account from Slovenia and do not have electronic banking." Do not forget to put the date, place and your signature on it.

The amount will be automatically paid to your landlord's bank account.

The maximum amount the government will pay to your landlord for your accommodation is:

  • about €420 per month for a single person
  • about €545 per month for two persons
  • about €670 per month for three persons, €800 for 4 persons, €880 for 5 persons, €965 for 6 persons and €1,050 for 7 persons or more

If your rent as specified in the rental agreement is below the maximum, the government will pay whatever your rental agreement says. Financial aid for rent lasts 3 months. You will need to renew it 30 days before it expires.


(UPDATE 30.3.2022)

Within the first month

Health insurance

(UPDATE 30.3.2022)

The Slovenian health system has several layers:

  1. emergency healthcare (free for everyone)
  2. basic health insurance (compulsory)
  3. supplementary health insurance (voluntary)
  4. additional health insurance (which very few people have)

Citizens of Ukraine (applicants for international protection or others who have entered Slovenia because of the war) are entitled to emergency healthcare, which includes:

  • emergency medical assistance, emergency ambulance transport, emergency medical treatment, emergency medical and dental services and other healthcare services (emergency medicines), following a decision made by an attending doctor 
  • healthcare for women, including healthcare during pregnancy and labour
  • healthcare for children and adolescents

If you have a medical emergency, you can obtain care at any of the emergency medical centres ("urgenca", some of them are listed here) or at any community medical centre ("zdravstveni dom"). You will also get free medicines for all urgent situations and chronic diseases. Once a doctor prescribes you the medicine, you can pick it up at any pharmacy in the country by providing the prescription ("recept") and your temporary protection card, passport or other identity document.

If you start to work/get a job

You are automatically covered by basic health insurance, but please note: almost everyone in Slovenia has supplementary health insurance, which in practice removes the need for co-payment in most cases. If you can afford it, we strongly recommend that you get it. It costs €35.67 per month and is offered by private insurance companies. You can find a list of them here.

You can apply for supplementary health insurance online, but you will need a Slovenian speaker to guide you through the forms.

Under-18s with temporary protection (or asylum) status receive supplementary health insurance automatically.

If you have not applied for temporary protection (or asylum)

This means that you are essentially staying as a tourist (i.e. for up to 90 days); you should therefore definitely arrange health insurance. The Vzajemna insurance company offers insurance for foreigners in Slovenia.


Obtaining a work permit

After your temporary protection (or asylum) application is approved, you automatically have a general work permit. This means that you can enjoy full access to the labour market in Slovenia (more on how to get a job below).

Applying for a tax number

(UPDATE 8.4.2022)

In many business situations (such as starting employment or performing certain types of transactions), you will need a Slovenian tax number (“davčna številka”).

You can apply for a tax number even before you obtain temporary protection, by using your Ukrainian documents or your temporary protection status card (if you already have one). We strongly advise you to do it as quickly as possible.

You will need to fill out this form. You can submit it in three different ways:

  • You can go to any of the local tax offices in person (with the exception of the "General Financial Office"). Make sure you have your identity documents with you (e.g. your passport, or temporary protection card if you already have one).
  • You can post the form, together with a copy of your identity documents (e.g. your passport, or temporary protection card if you already have one) to any of the local tax offices (with the exception of the "General Financial Office").
  • Unfortunately submission via e-mail is not possible (we have previously documented that it is, but the tax office has let us know that this was only a temporary measure)

The official government information page is here in Slovenian and here in English.

(UPDATE 31.3.2022) You can watch a helpful video in Ukrainian about obtaining a tax number.

Opening a bank account

In order to conduct financial transactions in Slovenia (including receiving your salary if you get a job), you will need a euro-denominated bank account with an IBAN number.

If you already have an account with an EU bank, anyone in the EU can transfer money to you quickly and easily.

UPDATE 14.3.2022: The European online bank Revolut has announced that it has streamlined the process of opening accounts for refugees. We strongly suggest that you open an account with them immediately after arriving in Slovenia.

UPDATE 11.4.2022: NovaKBM bank has specifically focused on opening accounts for Ukrainian refugees. They are the second largest bank, with many offices across the country. They offer an account that is free for the first 3 months (Slovenian explanation, Ukrainian explanation).

You can start the process of opening a bank account with any Slovenian bank as soon as you have applied for temporary protection (or asylum). However, despite being required to do so by law, banks are sometimes reluctant to take on persons under temporary protection or asylum as customers—so be warned that the process might take longer than expected. It might be simplest if you try opening the account as a non-resident with your Ukrainian passport, i.e. without relying on your temporary protection (or asylum) status. If the bank refuses, be persistent and try out different branches or banks. We have heard about people having positive experiences with SKB bank. Unfortunately, none of the most useful types of account are free, with the cheapest account working out at €5 per month.


Looking for a job

There is currently a labour shortage in Slovenia, which is good news. However, most jobs require a knowledge of Slovenian. You should also be aware that none of the vacancy boards have listings in foreign languages, so Google Translate will come in handy here.

Some resources to get you started:

  1. Moje delo (largest vacancy board in Slovenia)
  2. Slo-tech vacancy job board (for IT-related jobs)
  3. Government-run vacancy board
  4. UPDATE (19.3.2022) List of doctoral and post-doctoral research positions at Slovenian universities and research institutes.
  5. UPDATE (21.3.2022) Kariera.si is an employment agency that has started a specific programme aimed at providing work opportunities for Ukrainians in Slovenia: https://ukraine.kariera.si/

UPDATE (21.3.2022): If you are a licensed medical doctor or dental practitioner, we will make every effort to include you in the Slovenian medical system as soon as possible. Write an email to the contact person at the Medical Chamber of Slovenia ("Zdravniška zbornica Slovenije"), Mrs. Vesna Habe, at [email protected]. Include basic details, such as your field of training, years of experience and the languages you speak. You can also call +386 1 30 72 123.

(UPDATE 5.4.2022): The process of recognising foreign qualifications for medical professionals is described here (it has also been translated into Ukrainian).

(UPDATE 11.4.2022): If you are a student with student status in Slovenia, you are also able to apply for occasional or part-time jobs. You will need to do this through an employment agency for students ("študentski servis"). One of these agencies offers more information on the entire process here.

(UPDATE 11.4.2022)

Access to childcare and education

(UPDATE 1.4.2022)

Slovenia will provide:

  • free primary education
  • free secondary education
  • free kindergarten

The challenges lie in the details. Our general suggestion is not simply to follow the rules stated by the government, but also to contact local school managers and try to get them to help enrol your children in the Slovenian schooling system. They might show more empathy and flexibility, and get the educational process started even if not all formal conditions are yet met (e.g. before you have full temporary protection status).

The governmental page explaining a few basic details about school and kindergarten is here. It is in Slovenian only, but you can use Google Translate. A list of all educational institutions, from kindergartens to secondary schools, is here.

Kindergarten

Kindergartens in Slovenia take children aged between 11 months and 6 years (the age at which children generally start school).

Every kindergarten sets its own rules, but you can expect to drop off your child at 6 am or later and pick them up before 4 pm. Children can spend a maximum of 9 hours at the kindergarten on any given day. Generally speaking, kindergartens are run very professionally and are trustworthy. Most are organised by municipalities, but some are entirely private.

If you have already sorted out your pocket money or financial aid (see above), then you will be able to enrol your child in kindergarten entirely for free. You will need to show the document you received when your pocket money or financial aid was approved.

If you have not received pocket money or financial aid, you are still eligible for a discounted kindergarten fee, or possibly even for kindergarten free of charge. You will need to go to one of the Social Services Centres ("CSD") to apply for the discounted kindergarten fee. You can find a list of CSDs in each region at the bottom of this page. Simply go there and talk to them. They will try to help you submit the right forms. CSDs are one of the few "consultative" governmental institutions that will actually try to help you. However, if you don't speak English, you will need a translator. A list of all kindergartens is here.

There are reports all around the country about refugee children starting to join regular kindergarten programmes, so it is clear that this part of the system works.

Primary school

Primary school in Slovenia starts at 6 years of age and lasts 9 years. While it is entirely free, parents do have to meet the costs of basic school necessities such as pens, textbooks and notebooks.

You should enrol your child in primary school by simply going to the nearest school and asking whether they have space. The list of all primary schools is here. If the nearest one does not have enough space, they should direct you to a school nearby that can accept your child. Generally, each school will find a way to include your child in regular classes, for example by providing some initial Slovenian lessons and similar. Schools are also expected to organise whole-year Slovenian-language courses for refugee children. Actual implementation largely depends on the school in question.

After you obtain temporary protection, your child will receive free meals in school, which include a morning snack and a hot meal at midday. Your child will also be entitled to free rides to school if a school bus is organised from where you are located. If you have temporary protection, you will also be able to borrow textbooks from the school's "textbook fund" for free.

Since obtaining temporary protection takes a while, you can assume that the school will be flexible and provide you with free help even before you are formally granted temporary protection. This largely depends on the empathy of the school managers and their willingness to bend the rules a bit.

What can you expect from primary school? Schools in Slovenia are generally safe places for children. The school day usually starts at 8 am, but "morning care" is often provided, which means you can drop your child at school from 6 am or 7 am. Classes usually last until 1 pm for younger children and until 3 pm for older children. "Afternoon care" is provided until 4 pm or sometimes beyond that.

There are reports all around the country of refugee children starting to join regular school programmes, so it is clear that this part of the system works.

Secondary school

After completing 9 years of primary school, children enrol in secondary schools. There are several different types of secondary school:


- "gimnazija", which is designed to prepare students for university
- "strokovna šola" (vocational school), which is designed to train students for a specific profession (e.g. carpenter, hairdresser, mechanic)

Secondary school usually lasts 4 years, but some programmes are also shorter (2 or 3 years).

Secondary school is free to attend for everyone who has completed primary school. Selecting the right secondary school for your child can be difficult and we suggest that you seek some local advice. There is a government list of all secondary schools here,and an unofficial list here. We suggest you simply visit the school of your choice and ask how to apply. If you don't speak English, you will need a translator with you.

After you have obtained temporary protection, your child will get a free snack at school in the morning.

Secondary schools are supposed to offer an intense Slovenian course for all new students (70 hours).

Since obtaining temporary protection takes a while, you can assume that the school will be flexible and provide you with free help even before you are formally granted temporary protection. This largely depends on the empathy of the school managers and their willingness to bend the rules a bit.

University education

UPDATE (24.3.2022) The University of Maribor has announced that Ukrainian refugees will be able to join classes mid-year via an Erasmus scheme (which is otherwise a scheme for the pan-European exchange of students between universities). In the next academic year, which starts in October 2022, credits earned via the Erasmus scheme this year will be automatically recognised. Please send them an email at [email protected].

UPDATE (11.3.2022) The University of Primorska, located in the coastal region, is also promising the immediate participation of Ukrainian students in existing programmes. You can contact them at [email protected].

The University of Ljubljana says that it has already started enrolling multiple Ukrainian students into its programmes. You should write to them at [email protected] for further details. General information about the University of Ljubljana's response to the crisis is available here (in Slovenian).

Students of Slavic languages at the University of Ljubljana are offering help with integration into Slovenian society, learning the language, etc. You can contact them at [email protected].

UPDATE (11.4.2022) As a student you are able to work under the "student work" scheme. This is a simple system in which you can get paid by the hour. These jobs go through an intermediary ("študentski servis"); they take care of payment transactions and taxes, and also aggregate job listings. There are multiple student services, although this one has some good information available in the English language.

Mobile voice, text and data

There are multiple mobile network operators in Slovenia. If you do not have a data plan that works for you in Slovenia, it is easy to obtain a prepaid SIM card.

Based on our understanding of the market, we recommend that you use the operator A1. The maxiSIMPL prepaid plan lasts 30 days and, for €7, should give you enough voice/text/data to meet your usual needs, except perhaps for streaming movies (10,000 MB of data, 10,000 minutes or 10,000 texts per month). It allows you some international data roaming in case you decide to leave Slovenia. There is also a €5 plan if your data needs are smaller. You will also need to buy a SIM card, which costs €3. A list of A1 store locations is here: just go to the store and let them set it up for you on your phone.

This site extensively documents all prepaid mobile plan options available in Slovenia. Some data might be a little out of date, but it is generally correct.

Mobile operators Telemach and A1 have said that they will donate prepaid SIM cards and wi-fi mobile access points to refugees via the Slovenian Red Cross. As there is currently no further information on this scheme, we recommend that you make enquiries at an asylum centre.

UPDATE (24.3.2022) The mobile operators A1 Slovenija, T-2, Telemach Slovenija and Telekom Slovenije have made all calls to Ukrainian numbers free.


Start learning the language

Slovenian is a Slavic language and should be fairly easy for you to learn.


TV & radio

(Update 24.3.2022) Slovenian national television (RTV Slovenija) is re-streaming Ukrainian radio here. A Ukrainian live TV stream can be found here.

Transport in Slovenia

Slovenia has a good motorway system and a fairly serviceable (if slow) public transport system.

If you have your own car

Slovenian motorways require a pass or “vinjeta”. However, the Ministry of Transport has waived this requirement for people coming for humanitarian reasons. In short: if you have a UA license plate, you can confidently use the motorways here without fear of being fined.

Public transport

As of 4 March 2022, all public transport (local, regional and country-wide) is free if you have a Ukrainian passport or personal identification card. This is fairly recent information and not all drivers and conductors will know about it. If you encounter problems, insist (if necessary, show this tweet from the minister of infrastructure).

Peer-to-peer transport

The most popular community ride-sharing site is called Prevoz.org. It allows you to search for rides people are offering, along with times and prices. Unfortunately, it is only available in Slovenian (although Google Translate should help). You will need to register to be able to see the phone numbers of those offering rides. You will have to call or text them to arrange the details. Most of the time you should be able to do this in English.

The same site also offers international transfers from/to Slovenia and other countries

Ljubljana

Buses. Ljubljana has a good public bus network. Since all public transport is free for Ukrainian citizens, you simply need to show your passport, personal identity card or temporary protection card to the driver when you get on the bus.

Bikes. Ljubljana is a small city and perfect for cycling. For €4 a year you can access the Bicikelj public bike-sharing network. You will need an Urbana card (more information about it here) or a mobile phone to use it.

Maribor

UPDATE (24.3.2022) Buses. All Ukrainian citizens who have applied for temporary protection or asylum are entitled to use Maribor city buses for free. Go to the ticket office at the main bus station with your temporary protection or asylum application and you will get free tickets. Tickets will be free until the end of 2022.

Other cities

Many cities and municipalities in Slovenia have a free (or almost free) public bike-sharing system. Some of them can be found at Nomago Bikes. For an English-language description of how it works, click here. If you are placed in an asylum centre, it is best to ask locally for access to bikes. Here is a map of known rental locations (currently no web links).

Access to legal advice

The University of Ljubljana is offering legal help for refugees. You can write them at the following addresses: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected].